Type of game:
Ball Game
Character of the game:
Competitive
Country of origin:
Poland
Aim of the game:
To pass the ball through one of the three rings in the net in such a way that the ball strikes the ground within the other team’s half.
Number of players:
Multi Player
Usually 4 on each side, but it can also be 3 or 6 if needed and at least one referee.
Age
10 +
Difficulty:
Medium
Area of play:
Indoor or outdoor volleyball court (18 x 9 m)
Indoor Outdoor
Equipment
Ball A special pierścieniówka net with three holes in it and a volleyball.(To purchase a net, please visit: http://wildex.com.pl/)
Motor skills
Coordination Balance
Social skills
Cooperation Competion Decision Making
Cognitive skills
Strategy Building Tactics
equipment
Background
This game stems from the traditions of Polish fishermen who played by throwing buoys through holes in their fishing net. A Polish PE teacher, Włodzimierz Robakowski, elaborated it as a game in 1935. Pierścieniówka rose in popularity until World War II when it was forgotten for years. The game was revitalized in 2000 by scholars from University School of Physical Education in Poznan and is now growing again in popularity. It is a game known in other European countries such as Spain and Kosovo and can be found in Asia and North America.
Source: Robakowski W (1935), Polska gra sportowa „Pierścieniówka” dla młodzieży i starszych, Łódź.  
Set up:
Draw a 18x9 m playing field on any indoor or outdoor area such as a volleyball court and place a pierścieniówka net 2.24 m high. Pierścieniówka most often involves two teams of four players that play on opposing sides of a court. Three of the team players are confined to playing in the rear part of their side, which extends from the rear boundary to 1.5 meters from the net. One player (the playmaker) stands on the front boundary which is 1.5 meters to the net or center line. 
Rules
At the beginning of the game, a player serves the ball over the net. Once over the net, the ball cannot touch the ground and must be passed between teammates a maximum of three times. If the ball touches the ground/floor or goes out of bounds, the opposing team scores a point. The playmaker’s role is to pass the ball to one of the three players of his team in the back area to enable their teammate to pass the ball through one of the three rings. In contrast to volleyball, players can catch the ball before passing. The playmaker may not throw the ball through the rings. All players can move during a game, but only without the ball. No player can move while holding the ball.
There is a rotation of players after each change of service (like in a volleyball game). The first team to reach 15 points (with the rule of 2 advantage points) wins a set. The game is over after 3 sets. 1 referee is enough (for official matches 2 linesmen and 1 official are needed).
This is an inclusive, non-contact game which can be played by boys and girls in all seasons.
Teaching Styles:
  • Provide clear and simple instruction
  • Balance the ability level of the teams
  • Complete a walk through the playing area
  • Practice game before introducing scoring
  • Encourage players to communicate throughout the game
  • Safety instructions to be tailored to the environment and participants playing the game
Rules:
  • Increase/decrease number of players
  • Allow ball to bounce once before being returned
  • Minimise the number of rules or introduce one rule at a time
  • Allow players to catch the ball any way they can
Environment:
  • Increase/decrease size of boundary areas
  • Increase/decrease size of playing area
Equipment:
  • Increase/decrease the level of net
  • Range of balls can be used that vary in weight, size, speed, texture, density etc.
  • Audible equipment can be used ( e.g. bell or rattle ball, nets that have a buzzer)
  • Brightly coloured equipment can be used
Background
This game stems from the traditions of Polish fishermen who played by throwing buoys through holes in their fishing net. A Polish PE teacher, Włodzimierz Robakowski, elaborated it as a game in 1935. Pierścieniówka rose in popularity until World War II when it was forgotten for years. The game was revitalized in 2000 by scholars from University School of Physical Education in Poznan and is now growing again in popularity. It is a game known in other European countries such as Spain and Kosovo and can be found in Asia and North America.
Source: Robakowski W (1935), Polska gra sportowa „Pierścieniówka” dla młodzieży i starszych, Łódź.